New preliminary data from study evaluating digitalized cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia

  • Brain+ has developed the first digitalized Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST), a psycho- social group intervention capable of improving cognition in people with dementia (PWD).
  • Findings from a pilot study conducted by VIA University College investigating how a digitalized CST can support PWD and their close relatives or caregivers showed an average 2.3 MMSE points improvement in cognition for PWD adhering to the program.
  • The pilot results provide a basis for extended studies and for refinement of the digital CST program.

Copenhagen and Aarhus, November 17, 2020 

Brain+ announced findings today from a pilot study using their digitalized Cognitive stimulation therapy (CST). CST is a psycho-social group intervention capable of improving cognition in people with dementia (PWD) [1,2,3] and a culturally-adapted Danish model [4] has been validated. The pilot study examined whether the Brain+ Interactive technology supporting a basic and maintenance program (mCST) is relevant to use in Danish daycare facilities or in people`s homes in one-to-one interaction.

The study results were presented at #30AEC 2020, The European Alzheimer Association’s annual conference. The 2020 annual conference was held under the motto “Dementia in a changing world” 2020, The aim of the study was to investigate whether digitalized CST can support PWD and their close relatives cognitively and mentally in their homes and support CST training by professional CST facilitators in municipalities. The results among the “Super-users” showed an average improvement in cognition on 2,3; 2 with progress and one with status quo. The one with the progress of 3 MMSE points had started anti-dementia medication within the test period, which also can cause cognitive improvement.

The pilot results are not conclusive but point to potential cognitive benefits of intensive CST training. Among the “Low to Moderate-users”, one had small progress, another one a decline of 3 MMSE points, the latter had not been doing CST for the last month due to disease of a spouse. Oppositely, this participant had marked progress in the quality of life (QOL-AD) and highlighted in an interview that she has more courage to do and say things due to CST. Courage and higher self-esteem were also issues mentioned in the interview with another CST participant, the one, with the highest MMSE improvement.

Conclusion. 

The pilot results provide a basis for extended studies and for refinement of the digital CST program

The full results and trial abstract can be found in the link below.

References:
  1.  Spector et al. (2003). Efficacy of an evidence-based cognitive stimulation therapy programme for people with dementia: Randomized controlled trial. Br J Psychiatry 183:248-54
  2.  Lobbia et al. (2018) The efficacy of cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) for people with mild-to-moderate dementia: A review. Eur Psychol.
  3.  McDermott et al. (2019) Psychosocial interventions for people with dementia: a synthesis of systematic reviews. Aging & Mental Health 23(4): 393-403
  4.  Johannesen, Spector & Gregersen (2019) Kognitiv stimulationsterapi (CST): et evidensbaseret gruppeprogram til mennesker med demens: manual for gruppeledere. Den Danske Udgave, 1. oplag. VIA University College. ISBN 978-87-996897-4-3

 

Corresponding Author:

Rikke Gregersen RIGR@VIA.DK